Career paths

Learn about how to become an architect, planner, and/or  landscape architect, as well as how these professional degrees could lead to an exploration of other career options.

From student to professional, how to get where you want to go

Professions like architects, planners and landscape architects are protected by regulating bodies.

These types of professionals conduct work that impact the public well-being, and it is important that what they produce is reliable. Only individuals who have completed certification requirements can legally use these job titles. So how do you become one? And what if you don't want to become registered?


Undergraduate Studies

Your undergraduate studies are a first step towards achieving your career goals. Completing a pre-professional program, such as some of the Open Studies and the Minor in Architectural Studies, opens a wider range of graduate architecture programs you can apply to and reduces the number of years needed to complete a Master of Architecture.

Graduate Professional Degrees

For many students, their first step to becoming an architect, planner or landscape architect is by completing a master's degree. The Master of Architecture, Master of Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture programs we offer prepare you for taking those first steps towards certification. Many graduates of our programs have even pursued rewarding careers in other fields - some of which are adjacent to their degrees (like interior designer, botanist, or transportation planner) and others less so (like video game designer, film and television producer, or politician). No matter where your career takes you, a professional graduate degree can help you find success.

Internship and Exams

After completing an accredited graduate program, graduates need to find a mentor who is a practitioner in their chosen profession. These relationships are often formed during graduate school or part-time and summer work terms. For the first three to five years of work, you're considered an intern in your profession — and log hours towards certification, meeting regularly with your mentor. 

Learn about the internship and mentorship programs:

RAIC Architect Syllabus Diploma Program
PSB Professional Planner Career Path
AALA Landscape Architect Mentorship Program

Once you've completed and logged the required number of hours through your professional association, you can elect to take your professional exams.

After having passed all the exams, you can then call yourself a professional practitioner in your chosen field.

Licensed practitioner

Your path doesn't end there. Professionals are required by affiliated regulating bodies to complete a set number of continuing education hours annually.

Attending conferences and lectures offered by our faculty, completing post-professional courses, or volunteering your time as a guest lecturer or critic, are some of the ways we can partner in helping you complete your "ConEd" hours.